TransUnion

TransUnion Study Finds Student Loan Impact May Be Overblown

Despite an unprecedented rise in student loan balances over the past decade, a new TransUnion study found that student loan obligations do not inhibit younger consumers’ ability to access and repay other consumer credit categories such as auto loans and mortgages compared to peers without student loans.

Get the study
TransUnion

TransUnion Study Finds Student Loan Impact May Be Overblown

Despite an unprecedented rise in student loan balances over the past decade, a new TransUnion study found that student loan obligations do not inhibit younger consumers’ ability to access and repay other consumer credit categories such as auto loans and mortgages compared to peers without student loans.

Get the study

Rapid Rise in Student Loans

The percentage of consumers ages 20-29 with a student loan has skyrocketed from 2005 to 2014. In the last five years alone, student loan balances have increased from $589 billion in Q1 2010 to $1.1 trillion in Q1 2015.

Rapid Rise in Student Loans

Convergence in Loan Participation

Convergence in Loan Participation

The study also looked over longer timeframes to find if consumers with student loans in repayment caught up with the control group in terms of new loan participation and originations.

Consumers with Student Loans: An Attractive Group for Lenders

TransUnion found that consumers ages 18-29 with a student loan in repayment generally have lower delinquency rates on new accounts than their peers without student loans.

Consumers with Student Loans Attractive for lenders

Like it?

Get the study

read our privacy policy